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here on world report. again, we are continuing to keep a close eye on the situation of the jpl in pasadena. but, we will also have a story on the future of recycling in china and why it cost hundreds of thousands of jobs. i love to eat. i love hanging out with my friends. i have a great fit with my dentures. i love kiwis. i've always had that issue with the seeds getting under my denture. super poligrip free -- it creates a seal of the dentures in my mouth. even well-fitting dentures let in food particles. super poligrip is zinc free. with just a few dabs, it's clinically proven to seal out more food particles so you're more comfortable and confident while you eat. super poligrip free made the kiwi an enjoyable experience. [ charlie ] try zinc free super poligrip. wisconsin, friends and family came together in a park for t.o. remember the victims mafs shooting at a sikh temple. the attack happened at oak creek just outside milwaukee. ted rollins reports, authorities are treating the incident as domestic terror. >> reporter: investigators will spend the night combing not only th
sunday night. >> this is going to be a good show. for nasa and j.p.l. this is knowing they've done all they can z landing on mars is not easy. in previous tries we've suck said seeded only owe% of the time. and this will have a world wide audience. if there is curiosity then it probably began with this. the now famous seven minutes of terror video depicting a landing. >> there is something difficult we know. and this is anxious moment. whether or not i had a video to look at. >> the lead scientist had only minutes to speak with us today. his space craft and mars moved closer together. the target is a crater where water once flowed. and there is an opportunity to read the planet's history. >> succession is layered giving us a recorded history of probably what represent hundreds of millions of years of time, maybe a billion years of time when the planet may have been more like earth had been. >> it will not be looking for light but signs of it. clues indicating conditions once existed on mars and there is not only scientific but philosophical. >> if there is light next door that awakens
pattern on those wheels. it is morse code for jpl, jet propulsion laboratory. every time it rolls across the surface it will be writing jet propulsion laboratory on mars. you may think of it as the first graw fooy tee -- graffiti on mars. >> thank you very much, wayne. >>> now to the deadly shooting at a sikh temple in wisconsin. the fbi is treating the attack as a domestic terrorism case. authorities say local sikhs were gathering for sunday service when a man walked into the temple and started shooting. the gunman took the lives of six people before being killed by a police officer. that officer was wounded along with three others. >> this is a big tragedy for our church, a church we felt this was a safe place. we never thought this could happen in my church. >> police are now investigating the suspect's home which is located near the temple. >> and right now richmond police are on the scene of a fatal shooting on west mcdonald avenue near first street. officers were called there a little after 9 oocht 30 p.m. police say one person was shot to death. a second person was injured, but hi
at jpl. we take the same design that we used on the last mission and built them for msl. they are working very nicely. we checked out the cameras with that image and we are very happy. all the exposure times are as expected. after that image we acquired a 360 degree panorama. this graphic shows the thumbnail images from that panorama. we downlink those and put together this mosaic. these are being generated at jpl by the multi image processing lab. we will be down linking the full resolution versions of these images over the next day or two. the next graphic shows what we call a koehler projection. we took a panorama of the deck to document the state of the deck after landing. it is low resolution but you can see the rover of their -- there. q. can see the shadow of the rsm pointing to the right. -- you can see the shadow. we will get the full resolution version of those images down and we are looking forward to that. the next slide shows the first two full range images we have downloaded. this is a great shot pointed to the north. you can see in the near field these dour marks that the d
're watching. >> you see dot dot and then the dash. nasa was reluctant to let the folks put jpl stickers all over it up there. that's morse code for jpl. that's going to be the next thing. >> you know, john, not even on twitter. people will be ordering tires like that. people will want that on the soles of their shoe, beach sandals. all of that. >> every time the wheel turns it's jpl, jpl. it's pretty cool. >> i mentioned google mars. are they streaming images back through google mars? >> what they were doing is they were using, google mars image and they were tracing the dissent and exactly how they hit on the surface of mars and they use that whole google mars imagery which is spectacular stuff. they landed within a mile and a half of the exact point on mars. that's pretty good. >> pretty cool. the new thing. the rims are out. spinners are out. it's going to be tire prints. personalized tire prints. i predict that. thank you, sir. >>> a community demanding answers after a man handcuffed in the back of a police car dies from a gunshot. police say he shot himself but the feds are now investi
on planet earth who was watching. let's take a look at that moment in jpl when they got their confirmation. >> touchdown confirmed. we are safe on mars. >> [cheering] >> we are wheels down on mars. >> by the time they relayed the information curiosity had been on mars for seven minutes. look at the mix of triumph, relief and then unbridled joy as curiosity sent back the first images of the surface. thumbnails as they call them from each corner of the rover showing how sits and how it fares. it is the best possible outcome sharing this experience which is one reason why they came to watch at nasa aimes tonight. >> in a sometimes cynical, sometimes idealistic world it took an attempted landing on a different one, mars, to bring all of these people back to the aimes research center. >> this is eight and a half months of waiting at the end of a long mission. >> there are not too many mars landings in my lifetime, so i am glad to see one. >> it took the curiosity rover from space to the surface of mars. from an entry feet of 13 kilometers per second to 0 in ser harrowing minutes. a one-ton rove
-- mentioned that it has been declared a by california governor jerry brown, who will be visiting jpl later on. i want to start with our panel and introduce them. first we have michael meyer, the lead scientist for the mars exploration program in washington. we have the msl project manager for the jet propulsion laboratory. we have the physical investor of the -- investigator of the chem cam instrument from the los alamos laboratory in new mexico. next is the lead rubber plant at -- leader rover planner at jpl. also the principal investigator from chem cam in new mexico. last, the deputy project scientist at jpl. we will start with a special announcement from michael. >> before i make the announcement, which i think all of you will enjoy, i would like to show you a short video. this video was made on the eve of the arrival at mars -- this was in november of 1971. in the video, you will see a couple of people you might recognize -- bruce murray and carl sagan and ray bradbury. if we can look at that video -- >> i was hoping, during the last few days, as we get closer to mars and the dust cleare
been declared space day by california governor jerry brown who will be visiting jpl and meeting with the rover team later on. in the meantime, we'll start with our panel. and we're going to introduce them first of all we have michael mief michael meyer, the lead scientist for the mars program in washington. pete tisinger, the msl project manager for jpl and we have roger weans, los alamos national laboratory in new mexico. matt heverly is next, here at jpl and roger weans then is the principle investigator at cem in los alamos in new mexico, last but not least, joy crisp, the deputy project scientist at jpl. we'll start off with a special announcement this morning from michael meyer. >> well, thank you. actually, before i make the announcement, which i think all of you will enjoy, i would like to show you a short video. this video was made on the eve of the arrival at mars of mariner 9. this was in november of 1971, and in the video you'll see a couple of people you might recognize like bruce murray and carl seguin and ray bradbury. so if we could look at that video. >> i was ho
of terror. >> thank you. anyone who hasn't seen the video, google it. it is put out by jpl in pasadena. we have this robot hurdling through space at 13,000 miles per hour. it weighs one ton. it is the size of a mini cooper. the pathfinder was a microwave. this is big. headed through space. the atmosphere of mars is very thin. it is not as soft and gentle an entry as it would be here on earth. within seven minutes, it needs to go from 13,000 miles per hour to zero and land gently and this elegant sequence of events need to happen perfectly to land successfully. it involves parachutes and rockets. pretty marvelous feat of engineering. a lot has been invested. i talked to scott harber today. he used to be the lead researcher. he said the mood is of confidence, but tension. a blanket of tension over the confidence. we tested all these tools as much as we can. it is time to get on up there and give it a try. it is really high stakes. >> will this actually scoop things up and get it back to us or it will collect data? >> it will collect data and transmit back to us. how we will find out if it is
last second decisions on its own. with no help from the engineers at j.p.l. >> as far as the amount of control that the team has during entry, descent and landing, it's identical to the control that anybody watching at home has. we're all along for the ride. >> reporter: scientists can only watch as the last seven minutes of this ambitious mission determines the outcome says cbs news space analyst bill harwell. >> if it is a success it will be one of the great scientific triumphs of the space-age and if it fails i think it could be a setback for interplanetary exploration. >> reporter: the mission is to search for evidence that mars once could support life, an exploration that is expected to last two years. >> glor: what kind of tools and equipment does the rover have? >> well, it begins with the mask there that has a number of cameras on it to capture detailed panoramic images of regard mars as you have never seen before. other than that it is equipped to do what a human geologist would do on mars. pick up samples of rock and soil and then run them through an onboard laboratory to
:00 p.m. the event includes presentations and then from 10:00 to midnight, live broadcast from jpl laboratory. we'll have live coverage of the journey tomorrow at 6:00 and 11:00 expm get more information on her web site. under "see it on tv". >> alan: we have some rain out there? >> leigh: sprinkles. more or less a mist and drizzle. especially near the coast, and i want to show you the cumulus buildup, along the highest peaks. this is from the mt. tamalpais camera. you can see a little break 0 in the action, little heating taking place but it's then the subtropical moisture, live doppler 7hd picking that up nicely, and we have reports of a few showers. we're going to take you up north bay between santa rosa, towards pet human -- petaluma, a brief shower here, moving off towards the north and west. right here near shilo road, we have this -- this is a false return but what is not a false return i right here, this is moving to the north and east around napa. you'll see a little wet pavement. if this cell holds together -- they've been moving quickly from south to north and been falli
the team at the jet propulsion laboratory or jpl. you are steely eyed missile man and you deserve every missed high five of celebration. [ laughter ] it was nice to see nasa saved money by hiring staff from the local best biesm. [ laughter ] [cheers and applause] penny piing. folks, try to conceive of what was achieved this morning. we gently landed a one-ton six-wheel s.u.v. 154 million miles from original. that onstar lady is getting good. [ laughter ] we now have two rovers on the surface of mars and three satellites orbiting it. basically if the planets are a tray of doughnuts we have now licked mars. it's ours. [ laughter ] we already had the moon. we just need venus for the monopoly and we can start building hotels on them. folks in all this achievement there's only one thing that gave me pause. as the world waited to learn the fate of this death defying mission, the curiosity rover tweeted, quote, i'm safely on the surface of mars, gail crater, i am in you. [cheers and applause] [ laughter ] first of all, why know who this gale is but a gentleman does not kiss and tell. [ laughte
who was watching. let's take a look at that moment in jpl when they got their confirmation. >> touchdown confirmed. we are safe on mars. >> [cheering] >> we are wheels down on mars. >> by the time they relayed the information curiosity had been on mars for seven minutes. look at the mix of triumph, relief and then unbridled joy as curiosity sent back the first images of the surface. thumbnails as they call them from each corner of the rover showing how sits and how it fares. it is the best possible outcome sharing this experience which is one reason why they came to watch at nasa aimes tonight. >> in a sometimes cynical, sometimes idealistic world it took an attempted landing on a different one, mars, to bring all of these people back to the aimes research center. >> this is eight and a half months of waiting at the end of a long mission. >> there are not too many mars landings in my lifetime, so i am glad to see one. >> it took the curiosity rover from space to the surface of mars. from an entry feet of 13 kilometers per second to 0 in ser harrowing minutes. a one-ton rove
. by the question, i think i saw a jpl blog post that rob manning won the bingo game of where it was going to land. curious if there's anything more than accolades with that guess? >> we had multiple bingo games among different groups of people. the biggest one was a giant poster, about 10 feet long, that was printed out. rob was the closest. he was one of what we call our grumlins who operated our readiness testing, so we believe he may have rigged the system somehow. [laughter] >> ok, back in the room. >> i just wanted a little more information if any of you have it about the already iconic photograph of the parachutes descending with the rover below it. this picture had to be programmed far in advance -- is that right? >> yeah, that is right. we provided the first timing that we wanted this parachute picture to be taken way back in april. targeted for about six minutes after entry. the goal was to make sure that we focus on and if things do not go well. we wanted to see if we saw an inflated parachute or not an inflated parachute to see if there was damage or not. so the goal was to do it long
: where was the rover built? >> it was built here at jpl. we had lots of partners all over the world too, where the science missions have been donated by foreign countries. >> bill: did you do -- the launch -- or the landing, was so perfect. did you do any practice runs like -- i'm just curious, like in the desert or anything? >> there has been an extensive testing of everything on here instruments, landing. you name it we have tested it. i don't know if they did a full end-to-end testing. i would have to ask one of the landing engineers. >> bill: but certainly all of the instruments and cameras, was all tested. >> yes, we have continuing to test even today. we're doing extensive testing on the drilling and arm, and we'll continue to test all through the mission. >> bill: let me ask you what have we learned so far? >> we have learned that we have landed in a very exciting place. this mission is not -- unlike anything else we have ever flown. it's very, very complex. it has more instruments more things to do than anything we have put down on the surface of the planet. we
to talk to nasa tv live broadcasting from j.p.l. in pasadena, california. >> that converged at seven meters a second. >> right. >> and this is a separation of power light. down to 90 meters per second and sending. >> this is a power code with director of communications at this time. we're down to 86 meters per second and sending. we've lost tones from earth at this time. this is expected. we're continuing monitoring. >> and ground solution equals 18 seconds. >> standing by for back up separation. >> we're in power flight. descending about 0 meters per second. 500 meters in altitude. standing by for sky crane. >> we've found a place to come in ready for sky train 40 meters altitude. this is about 7.5 meters as expected. >> this is stable. stable. >> woo-hoo! woo! >> going to see where our curiosity will take us. >> now we know the landing was a success, lots of celebrating going on right now from jet propulsion laboratory in pasadena. tom, we see celebrating but what does this mean now that the landing was a success. >> this just opens the next chapter in mars exploration, congratulat
, integrated chief from jpl. doug ellison, visualization producer at jpl. we will begin with michael watkins. >> good morning. another fantastic day on mars -- curiosity continues to be paved basically flawlessly. we executed all the planned activities successfully yesterday. it is a good time for me to point out that the team operating curiosity is also performing flawlessly. completing all planned activities as well. it is really just a great day all around. the activities consist of a couple of things. we are about to do -- upgrade our software on the rover. just like we upgrade our operating system on your home computer or a laptop or something -- we will do the same thing. we will have a new flight software that is optimized for service. we landed with one optimized for landing. that does not have to operate the arm and all that. the surface is not have to land the vehicle. we want to switch to this new software that is optimized for service operations. we will do that starting tomorrow. -- the day after tomorrow, sorry. we'll start that activity. we will do preparation for that activit
. >> thousands. mission control at jpl, you have probably other people. they built the spacecraft there. everything was assembled there. and now you've got teams of scientists that are running the different instrument packages. so it's big team for a $2.5 billion mission i >> put something in perspective. we'll do a live remote with somebody. they could be in downtown washington. we could talk with them and there will be a significant delay from when i ask the question and you get the answer from the person. you go from place to place, you can't get coverage, you can't hear something would might be three miles away. >> is this a rap session. >> no, no, no, here is my question. how are we able to control this device 352 million miles away. how is it it can send a picture back within moments of landing on mars? >> because it is all set in the computer program. what they did for this was mars odyssey which is a spacecraft that is in orbit was using the radio uplink between the spacecraft which is now the rover and they were sending data back because the thing that is amazing, when she was
of people out here at jpl about the prospect of putting curiosity down at this location and about the pictures and ideas that will come back right away. take a listen to what they said. >> there's a lot of intellectual investment. the team has developed a truly fantastic, novel architecture that is the product of our imagination. it is exactly what we think it should be. so we are all in on this. >> reporter: they are definitely all in, and we can give you kind of a close up look of what curiosity pretty much looks like. this is obviously not curiosity itself, it's a model. it gives you an idea. about the size of an suv, and the technology on this, kelly, is unbelievable. >> as you've heard, they're all in, and if all goes well, what will this rover be doing when it actually it was down? >> reporter: well, you can get an idea. we have animation but also from ththe --live look as well. this rover -- the best way to put it. if you've been to the grand canyon or seen pictures, you've seen stripes of rock going all the way down the canyon. each one of those stripes is a slice of life.
malin. don sumner from the university of california in davis. andy mischkin from jpl. doug ellison at jpl. we will begin with michael watkins predicts good morning. but another fantastic day on mars. curiosity continues to behave basically it flawlessly three had executed all of the planned activity successfully and nominally yesterday. it is a good time to point out the team operating curiosity also is performing basically flawlessly and completing of planned activities as well. it really is a great day all around. a couple of things for these activities, we are about to do or upgrade our software on the rover, just like we upgrade our operating system on your home computer or laptop, we're going to do the same thing. the software though it is optimized for service. landing does not have to drive the rover and operate the arm. the service does not have to land the vehicle. we will switch to the new flight software that is optimized for surface operations. we will do that starting the day after tomorrow. sol 5. prep work for that activity. we will check out the backup flight comput
, the team chief from jpl, and doug allison, visualization producer at jpl. we will begin with michael watkins. >> we had another fantastic day on mars. curiosity continues to behave flawlessly and executed all the planned activities successfully after a period is a good time to point out that the teen operating curiosity is also performing flawlessly and completing all planned activities is well-preparedsol 3 activities consist of a couple of things. we are about to upgrade our software on the rover. we needed new flight software load that is optimized for the service garrett kern we want to switch to a new flight software that is optimized for surface operations. we will do that starting, the day after tomorrow. we have to do a little prep work for that activity. refit of some files to get ready to for the software transition garrett kern the other thing was to check out some more of our instruments. we checked out the instruments and that all past successfully and are all in great shape as far as we know. that is a great sign. no anomaly showed up in any of the tests. we took a lot
for missions to mars is only about one in three. here 59 jpl they've gone 13 for 18. that's a 7: -- .720 batting average in the red planet league. even so this time the nerves are racheted higher along with the stakes. >> facing budget pressure from the white house, nasa has reduced funding for mars missions and pulled out of plans to partner with the european space agency to stage an elaborate series of missions to mars to bring a rock sample back to earth. much to the dismay of the mars science community. jim bell is president of the planetary society and also on the spirit opportunity and curiosity imaging teams. >> it's frustrating to try and understand why the administration or congress would want to stop what so many americans are incredibly proud of and has been so successful. >> one of their big apply loos is democratic congressman adam shift who represents the california district that is home to the jet propulsion lab. >> if we step back from mars now at a time when we are tantalizingly close to finding the building blocks of life on mars, it may be decades before we go back. >>
, there is a bit of a peanut tradition. please explain. >> well, at jpl, you know, with a nearly 50-year record of unbelievable planetary exploration, about 40 years ago the tradition began of opening peanuts when a keen event in planetary exploration began. we passed the peanuts around for good luck right before opportunity landed. and of course some of the pebbles under the rover deck remind us of those peanuts so it's all a good thing. >> and also, mohawk guy. cnn talked to him just yesterday. let's roll the sound. >> the thought that in some way of kids and other people that are motivated to come work here because they see me and they say, that guy can put stuff on mars, maybe i can too, i would like to say it takes all types to make these missions work. >> have you been just overwhelmed by the excitement? and i'm not just talking about his mohawk, but the whole deep space exploration, really just this outpouring in the last couple of days i'm sure globally. what does that mean for you and nasa? >> well, it means so much for all of us, because this is an 11-year journey. the engineers at jp
watkins, the mission manager. miguel from jpl the chief engineer. sarah from jpl she is the high- rise investigation scientist. and john of caltech the project scientist of the mission. >> good morning everyone. welcome to mars, welcome back to march if he were here last night. the surface mission of curiosity has begun. for a long time, those of us on the project knew we had to go through some big events. but we built this rover not just to land on mars but to actually try weimar's and execute a beautiful science mission. we have ended one phase of the mission and to be a joy a lot of folks on our team. another part has just begun. it is really the fundamental reason we built a rover. we are just starting admission. we are not ending it. two hours after landing. just before 1:00 a.m., curiosity called us from mars odyssey. mars odyssey was overhead. it comes around two hours later. mars has rotated. it was still over the horizon. we were able to have a short talk with curiosity. she told us she is in service nominal mode. she quickly transitioned to surface and nominal mode. not in sa
is yet to come. we will start with the question and answer part. we will start here at jpl. wait for the microphone runner to get to you. we will go in the first row first. state your name and affiliation. >> irish television. could we get times on the major events for the hga deploy and mast. >> i will provide this to you after this. >> if you could talk about the geology. there seems to be three distinct ideological regions. is that the thermal inertia is known as? >> i've been so busy but this mahli -- with this mahli step. you can see the heat shield is on the surface with lots of small creatures. curiosity is on a surface that has a rounded hills and your small creatures. north of curiosity is this leiter toned terrain with lots of basins and pets. if it was up to me i would go to where those three come together. as a starting point. [laughter] you can start to get a flavor of what is going on here. do you want to say anything? >> i just made that up. >> we're going to take another question. it was in the same row but two people to the left. >> hello. i come from france. you
by laboratory -- i'm sorry. the jpl research scientist working with nasa, dr. luther beagle this morning. good to you have with us. >> good to be here. >> bill: curiosity as now we understand, on its way moving ever so slowly toward this mountainside is it or so of 400 meters away? >> yeah. we're moving to a place called triple plain. it's got a name -- i'm going to pronounce it wrong. but it is called galag. we've called it that because we have a naming convention. we've named this pretty interesting. we'll explore and see what's there. >> bill: how long will it take you to get there? 400 meeters is not a long distance. >> it is about a quarter of a mile. we're driving right now around 30 to 40 meters per day. it will take about ten days to get there if we go in a straight line. if we see something interesting along the way we'll stop and check it out. >> bill: what have we learned so far from curiosity? >> well, we've just come out of the checkout phase. we use the first two and a half, three weeks to make sure
from jpl. all those instruments, all those things are done at a very slow process right now. i know we're very impatient, we want to get pictures. >> i know. bring them now. >> they don't want to blow fuses. everything nice and slow and methodical. do one thing at a time. raise the mast. raise the cameras. the cameras we're seeing here are mounted on the front of the vehicle. the cameras we are seeing were the avoidance cameras, so it doesn't run into something it didn't know was there. that's all we have for you today. >> you always want to think there's some way to control it from here as well. chad myer, john zarrella, guys, thank you for bringing it back into english for us. we appreciate that. >>> here's what we're working on for this hour. police say this man was planning a deadly attack on a movie theater playing the new batman movie. we have the latest on this unbelievable story. >>> and the man who gunned down six people at a sikh temple is connected to white supremacist bands. we'll talk about the growing problem of hate groups in america. >>> and we're still live from the je
. john blackstone is at jpl in pasadena, california. john, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, jeff. i think we can safely say this morning that the jet propulsion lab is the happiest place on earth. because the "curiosity" over, the car-sized rover, this is just a model, the real thing is safely on the surface of mars. it's such a complex landing that some observers gave the chances of success at no better than 50/50. nobody had ever done anything like this before. and it was all happening 154 million miles away. >> we're just under six minutes to entry. >> in mission control, the tension was obvious as the spacecraft approached mars to begin what was called seven minutes of terror. but with each successful stage of the entry, confidence grew. >> parachute deploy. [ applause ] >> nothing was certain, however, until "curiosity" was confirmed to have landed safely on martian soil. >> touchdown confirmed we are safe on mars. [ cheering ] >> as the celebration began, mission control seemed to lose control. many involved had been working on this mars rover for a decade. >> lift-off. >>
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 68 (some duplicates have been removed)